Godfather Death (Continued) 2

by Terri Windling In contemporary fiction, a number of writers have drawn from death folklore and folk tales, creating stories and characters that are both memorable and thought—provoking. The Farthest Shore, the third book in Ursula K. Le Guin’s excellent "Earthsea" series, is an extraordinary meditation on death and how we confront it in our …

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A Chorus of Clowns (Continued)

by Midori Snyder As popular as the Atellan farces once were until the close of the first century, afterwards these stock characters diminished from the broad public stage. Scholars don’t know precisely why they disappeared, but given that they reappeared years later in Commedia dell’ Arte,it is believed that they returned to their rural roots …

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Italian Fairies (Continued) 2

by Raffaella Benvenuto According to the Penguin Dictionary of Symbols, fairies seem to have originally been emanations of the Earth Mother that subsequently became water and vegetation spirits, appearing frequently on mountains,in woods or forests, or near water–courses. This is particularly true of all those areas of the Italian territory where medieval legends merged with …

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Portrait Painter to the Fairies: Brian Froud, Endicott Studio for Mythic Arts 2

"I’m often called a ‘fantasy’ painter," Brian notes, "but my imagery springs from myth, folklore and the old oral story–telling tradition, not from the modern fantasy genre — although I’m grateful for the support that fantasy readershave given me over the years. I have to confess that, unlike Wendy, I rarely read fiction at all. …

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